Posts Tagged 'loyalty'

RE: RE: Letter to Verizon Wireless

If you’ve been following since the first letter I wrote, I just received a response to yesterday’s letter and here it is.  It’s short, it’s cold and it’s completely useless.  Notice that the second paragraph is the only thing this lady took the time to actually write to me, the rest is canned.

Dear [Mediocre Renaissance Man],

Thank you for your reply.  My name is [Service Chick] and I am happy to assist you.

[Mediocre Renaissance Man], at this time we do not know if we will have phones that will support the Android software. With [Service Dude]’s response, we cannot even mention any potential phones that have not been announced to the public. I am sorry for the inconvenience this may cause.

Thank you for giving me the opportunity to assist you today. We appreciate your business and thank you for using Verizon Wireless.  Should you have additional questions or concerns, please reply to this e-mail.

Sincerely,

[Service Chick]

Verizon Wireless

Customer Service

My response:

Dear [Service Chick],

I am sorry too.  I hope that Verizon offers or announces something before I move in a couple of months.

Sincerely,

[Mediocre Renaissance Man]

The long version:

I just wish they would reaffirm their intentions to release something, even with no definite time frame.  I think I made that clear in my communications with them, but I was talking to the wrong department.  Customer service doesn’t know much more than I do as a consumer.  I really should have tried harder to contact a different division.  Maybe I will, next time.

RE: Letter to Verizon Wireless

This is follow-up for the letter to Verizon Wireless that I wrote yesterday.

For the follow-up to these letters, see this entry.

The letter submission was successful, and I want to share the response I got back today with you.  I have edited the customer service member’s name out, as well as my own (just for fun, I’m sure most of you know it, I haven’t exactly tried to hide it from you).  Here’s the letter from Verizon, with my response immediately following it:

Dear [Mediocre Renaissance Man],

My name is [Service Dude], and I?ll be happy to assist you with your equipment questions today.

I am unable to provide information regarding which equipment is being considered or approximate release dates, as this may raise expectations that may not be met.

Although we do not have the handset you are looking for at this time, I invite you to view our current phone selection as a possible alternative.  To view available equipment, please click on the following link, which will direct you the “Products” page of our website:

http://www.verizonwireless.com/products

You may also receive free e-mail updates as to when new products and services are available.  To receive your free e-mail update please click on the following link, to view the “E-mail Updates” page of our website:

http://email.vzwshop.com/servlet/website/ResponseForm?OSPEJNlmhtLk_.2ef

There are several wireless phones being tested for functionality and reliability with our network.  Verizon Wireless will not offer a product or service unless it meets the high standards our customers have come to expect.  Verizon Wireless is constantly improving the services, features, and wireless phones we offer to our customers for their communication needs.

[Mediocre Renaissance Man], I hope this information has been helpful.  We value your business and appreciate the opportunity to continue as your wireless service provider. Thank you for using Verizon Wireless products and services. Should you have additional questions or concerns, please reply to this e-mail.

Sincerely,

[Service Dude]

Verizon Wireless

Customer Service

Here’s what I had to say to that:

[Service Dude],

Thank you for your timely response.  I fear you have understood my inquiry well, but somehow managed to pretend you missed the point.

I am familiar enough with Verizon’s complete lineup of handsets and I am not interested in any of them (I currently have the Samsung SCH-U620 and am not displeased with it).  I am not looking for just another handset.  I am looking for an Android handset.  Like I said in my initial communication, this is something of such a great importance to me that I am considering switching service providers unless I receive some indication that I will not have to wait long to get an Android phone on the Verizon network.

I do somewhat appreciate your vague statement about “several wireless phones being tested for functionality and reliability with [y]our network,” but I am afraid it does not provide enough of an assurance that an Android phone will be available to me soon.

I am sure you understand my position as a customer.  Having worked in customer service many years myself, one of the greatest customer service philosophies I came to understand is that loyal customers are the most important foundation on which a business should maintain itself.  If you begin to lose longtime, loyal customers, you hurt your business almost irreparably.

I hope that Verizon will announce something soon that will answer my question.  I will be moving away from my current home in California within the next few months, and when I get to my new home (even if my contract is not yet expired with Verizon Wireless) I will begin researching T-Mobile’s service in my area.  I am sure I am not the only Verizon customer with such plans.  The only way Verizon will be able to retain my business is if concrete plans to release an Android phone are revealed before I move.

I understand that I am just one customer among many hundreds of thousands on the Verizon network, and my changing networks will not ultimately hurt business for the company.  I am not trying to make threats.  I am simply pointing out the fact that good, valuable customers (like myself) are walking away from your company simply because of your inaction.  All it would take is one press release (dated 2008, last year’s press release is not enough) to assure Verizon customers that an Android phone is coming soon, and many customers would be retained.

Sincerely,

[Mediocre Renaissance Man]

Letter to Verizon Wireless

Dear Verizon Wireless,

I have been your customer exclusively since I purchased my first cell phone in my first year of college several years ago.  The years have been good to us, and I am pleased to report that I have been almost entirely satisfied with all of your services.

These days I work, support a wife and two children and maintain a technology blog in my free time.  As a longtime fan of Google products and services, I was thrilled by the announcement and unveiling of T-Mobile’s new Android enabled phone, the G1.  In fact, I was so excited about the new product that I immediately found myself at your competitor’s web site researching pricing and plan information.  My contract with Verizon won’t be over until November 2009, but I was already considering abandoning my favorite service provider to get the shiny new G1 in my hands, despite the complaints I have heard about T-Mobile services.

So, as a technology blogger, Google buff and loyal Verizon customer, I am asking you directly: when can Verizon customers expect to see an Android phone available?  I am aware that LG, Samsung and Motorola have all announced their intention to build Android phones, but which one(s) will we see on the great Verizon network?  Will Verizon just sit back and watch their customer base switch (even in small numbers) to a competing network without doing anything to retain them?

If Verizon would simply announce something (a date, timeframe or even just the intention to release an Android phone) – other than the announcement last year that Android would be supported on the Verizon network – many customers like myself would remain loyal and wait for the official arrival of a Verizon Android smartphone.

A clear and detailed answer to my inquiries would be much appreciated, and the failure to respond with action before my contract is up will result in at least one fewer Verizon customer.

Sincerely,

[Mediocre Renaissance Man]
Note to my readers:

I e-mailed this to them (via their “contact us” form on their website) today.  Now we wait and see.  I’ll let you know if I get a response.  I’d really rather stay with Verizon, but if I can’t get my hands on an Android phone on their network soon you can bet I’ll be switching.

Their response and my subsequent response can now be read here.

RE: Chrome

Amazon knows almost everything about nearly every major purchase I’ve made in the last four years (or longer, I can’t even remember when I started shopping on Amazon). Google knows all about who I’ve been in touch with, what I’ve been looking at, looking for and reading all over the Internet for at least the last three years, but probably even longer since I was using their search engine shortly after they first appeared online about a decade ago.

And, until recently (just today, actually), Firefox has been quietly and dependably facilitating all of my activities, communications and learning via the World Wide Web since I converted from Internet Explorer near the beginning of the millennium, around 2004 (not that I needed a good reason to leave that tired piece of reject code behind). All the way from 1.0 to version 3+ I’ve been a loyal supporter, fan and avid user of Mozilla’s beautifully designed desktop icon, Firefox. I upgrade every chance I get. I install plug-ins. I even bought a Firefox t-shirt and some stickers.

I still love Firefox, but now I’m feeling a little… confused.

It’s not like I didn’t tell her. Firefox knew all about our little “thing” since it started. Since February of 2005 I’ve been a raving fan of Gmail, Google’s (still beta, three years later) e-mail service, and Firefox was there when I signed up. When Google really started branching out into other services, especially with the iGoogle homepage, Google Docs and Google Reader, I was interested. After all, Google was a strong supporter of Firefox, so using their services wasn’t a disservice to my beloved web browser at all, was it? In fact, I was supporting a supporter of Firefox.

A couple of days ago I heard that Google was on the verge of releasing their new browser, Chrome. I read a nice article about it from a source I enjoy reading (and usually trust) and decided to give it a try. I had already been using Google Desktop on my Linux laptop and Google’s Picasa photo software on my Windows computer, and I love Google Earth, Google Talk and Google’s release of SketchUp, so a Google web browser didn’t sound all that bad.

My first impressions are a mess of mixed feelings, but overall I am both impressed and pleased. I can come up with really only one major gripe (other than that Chrome doesn’t support any good plug-ins yet, like Adblock Plus) having to do with the way it handles RSS and other subscription feeds, but despite how much I do like the newcomer, my beloved Firefox is dormant even now while I use Google Docs to write this from within Chrome, and I’m not sure how I feel about that.

I’m enjoying the experience, but with a touch of bitterness. Chrome is not Firefox. Mozilla took on a web browser giant and made some major headway and history, significantly impacting Microsoft’s monopoly on the web browser market. Now Google wants to offer Internet goers yet another option, and I’m all for competition, but now I am forced to question my personal definitions of loyalty and support in this grand game of Hungry Hungry Web Browsers.

Would making the complete switch to Chrome be betrayal? I’m not ready for that yet, as I have fallen in love with the features many of Firefox’s plug-ins offer as well as Firefox’s inherent feature-set. I don’t think Chrome is that far behind though, and it will probably catch up soon. What should I do? Obviously I’ve switched before, and it’s not like I’m married to Firefox, but I had never felt loyalty for a product before like I do for Firefox – or so I thought. Perhaps what I felt wasn’t loyalty at all, but satisfaction. If I can find satisfaction somewhere else, and we’re not talking about marriage here (of course) then perhaps I belong somewhere else.

That’s how I handled my switch from a mail service I liked (go.com, before Disney bought them – do you even remember them?) to a mail service I love. That’s how we should do business, that’s why there’s competition. There has to be choice.

But then, I’ve been with Firefox longer than I’ve been with my wife. We go way back (in Internet years, anyhow). Just now I was doing some research to get the dates right for when Firefox was first released, and when Google really got their start. I typed “http://www.wikipedia.org” into the address bar, then hit “TAB” and it displayed this:

Then I could type in my search without ever having to load the main Wikipedia page. Of course, Firefox and other browsers have offered this function in one way or another (separate search bars, toolbars, plug-ins, etc.) but never has the workflow been this natural and easy (from later tests I found that I didn’t even have to hit the tab). That’s just one of many features they’ve included in their browser (the Omnibox).

They also snatched up the fastest JavaScript engine on the market (up to ten times than the system Firefox is running, and WAY faster than the IE JavaScript), and they set up their infrastructure to prevent many of the problems that older browsers are facing today with common viruses, bugs and page crashes that can disable the browser or even the whole computer.  
For more details on the technical aspects of this new browser, check out some of these articles:

  • Wired Magazine – the one I read that got me interested – the history, reasons behind it and some of the new technology in a well-written, easy-to-read, fun presentation
  • Blogoscoped – very good basic rundown of the features
  • Washington Post – good review of some of the features
  • PC World – good article, seven reasons for it and against it
  • USA Today – a nice, brief review

In the end, Chrome has many awesome, powerful features that make it very attractive to me. I may end up switching when they make those last couple of changes to make it just a little more attractive to this (still) loyal Firefox user.

No matter what happens, though, I’m keeping my Firefox t-shirt.


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