Posts Tagged 'google docs'

Official Book Giveaway 2

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This contest has ended. Thank you to all who entered. See the post-contest analysis post.

Facebook Drives Me Nuts

Book Giveaway Sweepstakes (round 2)

Official Rules

1. Eligibility

This drawing is open to anyone in the U.S. with a brain except:

  • Anyone who is Brian Haddad (the author of the book to be given away), his wife, children or pets.
  • The winners of the previous sweepstakes of the same title (you already have one of my books, I’m not giving you another one).
  • People who have mailing addresses outside of the United States of America.
  • Non U.S. citizens. This is mostly just to cover myself. If you’re not a U.S. citizen, I’m sorry. Maybe next time?

If you don’t meet any of those criteria, you are eligible to enter and win this drawing. Just to be clear: zombies do not have brains, so if you are a zombie please do not enter the contest.

2. Prizes

There are a total of ten (10) copies of Facebook Drives Me Nuts that will be signed by the author, defaced inside with a page full of doodles and mailed to five lucky winners. The prize is valued at over one million dollars ($1,000,000), but the actual monetary value of the prize is none of your business. The book retails for $12.99 in case you are interested.

The losers will be notified that they lost by way of a personal email or message from Brian Haddad, along with a consolation prize consisting of a group of seemingly random characters that serve as a discount code that can be used at https://www.createspace.com/3422240 when checking out to receive almost a full $3.50 off the price of the book.

3. How to Enter

Go to the official entry form and fill it out after the contest begins on Wednesday, January 27th.

Because Brian Haddad is a generous administrator of awesome contests, here are the elements of the form and how they affect your chances of winning:

Name, Email and Mailing Address

Seriously, do you need me to explain why these are necessary to win? Your information will only be used for this contest. I promise not to sell, disclose or lose your information to any person, business or other entity. If you have any questions, please post a comment on this page and I will address them.

Reading Habits (1 & 2), and Reviewing Habits (1 & 2)

People who lie to me here will not win. It’s plain and simple. I want people who are honest about how much they read and how they review what they read.

Write a Review

A link to three of my short stories is provided in the application form, and you are expected to review one of them. If you won’t even read a single short story that I wrote, I’m not sending you a whole book. Plus, I want people who can review what they read, even if they hate it. Loving or hating the short story you read will not alter your odds of winning, so don’t suck up thinking you’ll get a free book out of it. Just write a good review, clearly stating your opinion. A good sense of humor will be rewarded.

Dedication and Essay

These are your last chances, so make a good effort here. Convince me to send you a free copy of my book. Make me smile, chuckle, laugh or wet my pants, and I’ll throw some super-fun doodles in your prize in unexpected places. Please remember to keep it clean and mostly appropriate though. My wife will be helping me judge these, and if my six-year-old sees any dirty responses, I’ll take video of him crying himself to sleep and send it to you.

Beyond the official entry form, no other purchase, comment, communication or bribe will increase your odds of winning. Love letters in the comments on this page, on Facebook or by email couldn’t hurt though.

4. Deadline

Brian Haddad will stop taking entries after Saturday, March 20th, at which point the official application form will be taken down. If it is not taken down, and you submit an application, you still can’t win after the deadline.

5. Winning

The winner will be chosen from among qualifying applications that meet the criteria above. If more than ten (10) applicants meet the criteria, the author’s daughter will be handed a dowsing rod which she will use to select the winners. Winners will be selected and notified no later than one week after the close of the contest, or by Saturday, March 27th, 2010.

6. Other Details

Brian Haddad and his spouse are not eligible to enter the drawing. Neither are their past, present or future children or pets.

To ensure fair consideration, those entries that do not adhere to the rules and submission standards will be disqualified.

Brian reserves the right to use a winner’s partial name, quote, likeness or descriptive essence for publicity and promotional purposes. In fact, after you’ve read his book, he would appreciate if you wrote some kind of review or testimonial that he can use to promote the book. Rating and reviewing the book on Amazon.com would be rewarded with one thousand (1,000) rainbow unicorn kisses.

This contest and drawing is void where prohibited. There is no purchase necessary to enter or win. Not only that, but there is nothing that you could possibly buy that would help you win. Money does not buy happiness. Late or incomplete entries will not be accepted. Brian Haddad is not responsible for lost, stolen, late or misdirected entries. In the event that a user submits more than one entry, the author will chose which ever entry he sees fit. It is in your best interest to submit only one (1) entry.

Any Last Words?

Once you have read and understood these instructions and rules, please proceed to the entry form and fill it out completely. Good luck!

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Thoughts on Chrome So Far

I was about to write all about my problems with Chrome and Google Docs, so I did a quick document in Google Docs from Chrome, sent it to my blog at WordPress and grabbed screen shots of everything, then went to Google Docs in Firefox to grab screen shots of how it performs there and write up a quick document to show how it formats everything, then I was going to post that document to my blog to show how my work flow had been running so smoothly from Firefox.

Unfortunately, Google Docs wouldn’t post to my blog in Firefox for some strange reason (despite that I have always done things this way).  It’s always unsettling when things suddenly stop working the way they had been working consistently.

Overall, after using Chrome for nearly two weeks I have almost no complaints.  Of course, I was spoiled in Firefox with all of the ad blocking add-ons, bookmark synchronizing and other plug-ins that will surely be a part of Chrome in the future.  From an everyday use point of view, Chrome has met all of my needs and shown me a better way to browse the web in most cases.

On the features page for Google Chrome they list ten features that have been talked about since even before the browser launched a couple days shy of two weeks ago.  Taking a shortcut in writing my official initial review of the Google Chrome browser, I am going to list each of the ten features and write about my personal experiences with that feature.

One Box for Everything

AKA, the Omnibox.  Let me just say that I love the omnibox.  I have been trying to exploit all of its functionality since I began using the browser, and I think it may still be hiding cool features from me.  It just seems to be able to do everything.  You can type anything into it and when you hit “Enter” it just goes.  Sure, nothing is perfect, and I was hoping to be able to find a story I read earlier today somewhere by searching the omnibox, but it couldn’t find it (then, neither can I, searching the history, searching the web and retracing my steps, so I may just be dumb).

Of course, not much of what it does from a basic user standpoint is actually unique, it’s the fact that it is all combined into one place that makes it new.  It highlights the main domain URL, but so do some plug-ins and beta browsers.  It does both URL and search box jobs, which Internet Explorer has been doing with Microsoft’s own search when what you type doesn’t lead to a website.  Of course, the ability to search using a site’s search function before you ever load the page is a wonderful new feature.  The omnibox’s connection with your browsing history is extremely useful, and the fact that it has combined so many features into one place just makes me happy.

I’ve always loved Google’s approach to designing user interfaces, and they carried their ideas over to Chrome beautifully.  The omnibox is, of course, the very essence this philosophy.  If I didn’t have my bookmark toolbar turned on all the time the whole user interface would nearly disappear into my browsing experience.  Even with the slender bookmark toolbar I feel like Chrome is a much lighter browser than most of the competition.

New Tab Page

I use iGoogle as my homepage, but the new tab page in Chrome is so comfortable and useful, it’s almost like home.

It’s divided into four areas.  The first, and largest section being the Most Visited sites grid.  The grid contains thumbnails and titles of your nine most visited sites.  I’ve never used the Opera browser, but I guess this “dialer” approach is directly knocked off from Opera (I’ve also seen the feature offered by add-ons for Firefox).  Below the grid there is a link to your complete web history (also a nice looking, easy to use page).

The next section at the top of the right hand column is the Searches box.  Here search boxes grabbed right from sites you’ve visited and searched from are displayed for you to use.  This function is separate from the omnibox’s ability to allow you to search Amazon, for example by typing “amazon.com health and medicine” to search Amazon for “health and medicine.”  My Searches section has a search bar for my browsing history, Amazon.com, Wikipedia.com and YouTube.com, all places I’ve searched from lately.  Rather than loading those sites to search there, I can use the omnibox or the search box right on my new tab page.

The next box below the Searches box is the Recent Bookmarks box.  In my new tab page it lists the last nine bookmarks I saved.  I don’t know if it grabs those based on a time frame or will always list the last nine bookmarks.

Somehow, my current new tab page doesn’t have the final box (it’s usually there, and I’m sure there’s a good reason for it to be gone).  The final box displays recently closed tabs.  I have recently closed tabs, but by “recent” I mean a couple of hours ago.  I suppose this box is populated based on a time frame.  Either way, it’s the closest thing Chrome has to an “Undo Close Tab” function.

I use the new tab page frequently, though I don’t see it ever replacing my iGoogle homepage unless it can learn to display custom updates (new Gmail messages, new Reader feed content, messages and updates from other sites, etc.) from the sites I use most.

Application Shortcuts

Admittedly, I hadn’t used this function until just a few seconds ago, but it’s great!  I went to my site’s dashboard at WordPress and clicked on the “create application shortcuts…” menu item.  A box popped up showing me a preview of the icon and text for the shortcut, and below there were three check boxes for creating the shortcut on my desktop (checked by default), in my start menu and in the quick launch bar.  I left the default checkbox checked and hit OK.  Immediately, the WordPress tab jumped out of my main browser window and the whole Chrome interface disappeared.  At that point, the WordPress interface takes over and it behaves just like an application on my computer.

Just to try it out, I closed the WordPress window and opened the new shortcut.  I loaded quickly (Google Gears may have been playing a part in that) and worked beautifully.  I had originally worried that the shortcut might be an average Internet shortcut that opens in your default browser (still Firefox on my computer), but these shortcuts load in special, featureless windows designed to make the page feel like its own application.

Perfect.  I love this feature and will begin creating application shortcuts for all of my favorite web applications (and some I wasn’t using just because they weren’t accessible enough).

Dynamic Tabs

Dynamic is a good word for it.  Even just watching them move around so fluidly as I rearrange them, open new ones and close old ones, I love the way these tabs work.  Even better is the ability dock and undock tabs from different windows.  If I have three tabs open and I want to make sure one doesn’t get closed by accident while I am closing others, I can drag that tab down out of the tab bar and it separates into its own new window.  When I have the first window back in order, I can drag that separated tab back into the main window and I’m back to having only one browser window.  It’s fluid, it’s dynamic, it’s fast and it’s efficient.  I think it’s great.

Crash Control

Aah, what a relief.  Google Chrome runs each tab in a separate process on your computer so if something crashes one tab the rest of them can continue functioning.  In theory this should bog the system down a bit, but I haven’t noticed a drop in performance at all (and my system is OLD – 512 MB of ram, single core processor, and so forth).

Built in with these separate processes is a process manager.  I can’t figure out how to bring it up manually, but it comes up automatically if a tab is taking too long and gives you the option to shut it down.  I’ve heard the process manager can be viewed by bringing it up manually, but I haven’t cared to poke around enough to find it.

So far, after twelve days of continuous, daily use, I have yet to see any fatal errors, major problems or crashed programs.  The task manager has come up offering to let me wait on or close slow tabs only three or four times, and most the time I just choose to wait and the tab loads eventually (dumb slow ISP…).

Incognito Mode

True, this has been dubbed “porn mode” by many ever since the feature was made part of the new Internet Explorer and similar functions appeared through the use of plug-ins and third party applications.  Basically, this is a new browser window you can open that prevents any information from being stored on your computer (cookies, history, cache, browsing information of any kind, and more).

I don’t have much use for it as a “porn mode” but I did run some tests on it to see if it could indeed mask my web browsing activity as promised.  No sign of my incognito activity was recorded to the computer, just like they said.

Unless I’m trying to hide something from someone else who uses the computer, I really can’t see much of a use for incognito browsing (for me, personally).  I understand there are people who would want it for one reason or another, but it’s not really that exciting to me.

Perhaps the best part about this mode is the window that loads when you first open the incognito browser window.    

Click for larger view.

I love that last bullet point of things to be wary of – people standing behind you.  Especially with the nickname such a mode has earned, the idea of someone thinking they are safe looking at some dirty videos or images and someone else standing right behind them watching really tickles me.

Safe Browsing

Chrome is connected with Google’s directory of harmful sites and integrates this service into the browsing experience.  While my normal web browsing habits never take me to the darker corners of the net, I can see how such a service could be quite handy.

When you are about to view sensitive data over an insecure connection the browser warns you.  Also, as with any non-Internet Explorer browser, browser specific attacks are rare.  The separate processes for each tab also provide a certain degree of safety.  For a number of reasons, Google is entitled to claim that Chrome offers safe browsing.

Of course, security holes exist and a patch has already been issued in the form of an upgrade (an easy process once you know where to go – the About Google Chrome menu option).  No browser (to date) can claim to be 100% secure, but Chrome makes major strides in the right direction.

Instant Bookmarks

Bookmarking a page really is easy, especially since Google borrowed most of the process from already established models.  The star icon that I first saw in Firefox (though since I avoid Internet Explorer, Safari, Opera and Netscape I suppose it could have started in one of those) has reappeared in Chrome, and it has been improved upon.

While at a page you wish to bookmark, you click the star icon and a tiny menu box opens right there with options for renaming the bookmark and placing it in a folder.  There is an Edit button for more options, a Close button for if you don’t need to edit anything and there is a remove button to remove the bookmark (the same menu pops up every time you hit the star, even if the page is already bookmarked).  That’s it.  Simple, sweet and easy to use.

Importing Settings

When I installed Chrome it identified Firefox as my current default browser and offered to import my settings and data from Firefox.  I did, and it brought all of my bookmarks and cookies over, but I don’t think it brought my browsing history, which would have been nice.

Simpler Downloads

I really do like the download manager in Chrome.  There isn’t much to say about it though, because it’s just too simple and elegant to criticize or discuss.  It downloads things at the bottom of the window, the tab that initiated the download gets a little green down-arrow to signify that a download is being managed from there, the corner display has a percentage and bits downloaded progress circle, and the finished download display has a menu for interacting with the downloaded file.  That’s it.

The browser keeps a history of your downloads, which can be viewed like the browsing history.  A default download location can be set, and an option to “ask every time” can be enabled.

General Review

Again, this browser isn’t ready to replace my beloved Firefox browser as the default browser.  However, after twelve days of using it as my default browser, I have to say I’m only waiting for a few things to come together.

For one, if this post formats correctly after the transfer from Google Docs to WordPress, about 90% of my reason for leaving Firefox as the default browser will have disappeared.

If I have to go back and erase a bunch of DIV tags to get it to format correctly, I’m going to be quite annoyed and Chrome will have to start mowing my lawn before I’ll make it my default browser.

So I suppose we could consider the posting of this article the moment of truth between Chrome and me.  Of course, the formatting issue isn’t the only problem I’ve had with using Google Docs in Chrome.

Here is a summary of the problems I have encountered so far in Google Docs using Chrome:

1. It uses DIV tags to separate paragraphs in the HTML.  This does not happen in Firefox.  (See screenshot below.)  The DIV tag creats an issue in WordPress, and makes the whole thing format incorrectly.

Click for larger view.

2. The main Google Docs interface page is having troubles rendering correctly in Chrome (see screenshot below).  As of right now, the problem seems to be coming from a failed attempt to update the Google Docs application.  Right now I’ve got a red exclamation point where the little green circle should be.  That’s not good.

Click for larger view.

It never got past the 67% and now it says: “An error occurred while updating software. Failed to update software for the applications: Google Documents, Google Spreadsheets.”  If this isn’t Chrome’s fault, I don’t know who to blame.

3. When assigning text as a link, a space is often inserted after my selected text.  If my memory serves correctly, this may have been happening on occasion in Firefox as well.  May not be browser specific, but it can be annoying.

4. I don’t know whether to blame Chrome for this one, but Google Docs mysteriously quit posting to my blog from Firefox after I posted to my blog from Chrome just once.  Coincidence?  Maybe.

Conclusion

In conclusion, it is obvious that Chrome is having compatibility issues with certain web applications (eh hem, Google Docs; though others are probably out there) and that is to be expected.  For now, I forgive Google but I expect them to fix it, especially since my problems have to do with Google products.

To be completely fair, web standards play a huge role in this issue, and Microsoft’s near monopoly on the browser marked makes things difficult for smaller browsers (even Firefox).

Except for compatibility and web standard issues, I really don’t have many complaints about Chrome.  Google stripped the traditional browser of many features it felt were redundant, unnecessary or overly complicated and produced Chrome with all the features it needed wrapped up into a neat, efficient package.  I love the way it handles.  It feels like navigating the web in a technology demonstrator prototype vehicle.  Some things are a hundred times more efficient (Chrome does feel a little faster) and in other areas you’re bound to happen upon a bug or two.  I look forward to future releases and upgrades, and may soon make Chrome my default browser (especially if this post works out and I don’t have to redo the formatting).

*Update: The formatting issue remains an issue.  I suppose I’ll have to report this to the folks at Google. 

RE: Chrome

Amazon knows almost everything about nearly every major purchase I’ve made in the last four years (or longer, I can’t even remember when I started shopping on Amazon). Google knows all about who I’ve been in touch with, what I’ve been looking at, looking for and reading all over the Internet for at least the last three years, but probably even longer since I was using their search engine shortly after they first appeared online about a decade ago.

And, until recently (just today, actually), Firefox has been quietly and dependably facilitating all of my activities, communications and learning via the World Wide Web since I converted from Internet Explorer near the beginning of the millennium, around 2004 (not that I needed a good reason to leave that tired piece of reject code behind). All the way from 1.0 to version 3+ I’ve been a loyal supporter, fan and avid user of Mozilla’s beautifully designed desktop icon, Firefox. I upgrade every chance I get. I install plug-ins. I even bought a Firefox t-shirt and some stickers.

I still love Firefox, but now I’m feeling a little… confused.

It’s not like I didn’t tell her. Firefox knew all about our little “thing” since it started. Since February of 2005 I’ve been a raving fan of Gmail, Google’s (still beta, three years later) e-mail service, and Firefox was there when I signed up. When Google really started branching out into other services, especially with the iGoogle homepage, Google Docs and Google Reader, I was interested. After all, Google was a strong supporter of Firefox, so using their services wasn’t a disservice to my beloved web browser at all, was it? In fact, I was supporting a supporter of Firefox.

A couple of days ago I heard that Google was on the verge of releasing their new browser, Chrome. I read a nice article about it from a source I enjoy reading (and usually trust) and decided to give it a try. I had already been using Google Desktop on my Linux laptop and Google’s Picasa photo software on my Windows computer, and I love Google Earth, Google Talk and Google’s release of SketchUp, so a Google web browser didn’t sound all that bad.

My first impressions are a mess of mixed feelings, but overall I am both impressed and pleased. I can come up with really only one major gripe (other than that Chrome doesn’t support any good plug-ins yet, like Adblock Plus) having to do with the way it handles RSS and other subscription feeds, but despite how much I do like the newcomer, my beloved Firefox is dormant even now while I use Google Docs to write this from within Chrome, and I’m not sure how I feel about that.

I’m enjoying the experience, but with a touch of bitterness. Chrome is not Firefox. Mozilla took on a web browser giant and made some major headway and history, significantly impacting Microsoft’s monopoly on the web browser market. Now Google wants to offer Internet goers yet another option, and I’m all for competition, but now I am forced to question my personal definitions of loyalty and support in this grand game of Hungry Hungry Web Browsers.

Would making the complete switch to Chrome be betrayal? I’m not ready for that yet, as I have fallen in love with the features many of Firefox’s plug-ins offer as well as Firefox’s inherent feature-set. I don’t think Chrome is that far behind though, and it will probably catch up soon. What should I do? Obviously I’ve switched before, and it’s not like I’m married to Firefox, but I had never felt loyalty for a product before like I do for Firefox – or so I thought. Perhaps what I felt wasn’t loyalty at all, but satisfaction. If I can find satisfaction somewhere else, and we’re not talking about marriage here (of course) then perhaps I belong somewhere else.

That’s how I handled my switch from a mail service I liked (go.com, before Disney bought them – do you even remember them?) to a mail service I love. That’s how we should do business, that’s why there’s competition. There has to be choice.

But then, I’ve been with Firefox longer than I’ve been with my wife. We go way back (in Internet years, anyhow). Just now I was doing some research to get the dates right for when Firefox was first released, and when Google really got their start. I typed “http://www.wikipedia.org” into the address bar, then hit “TAB” and it displayed this:

Then I could type in my search without ever having to load the main Wikipedia page. Of course, Firefox and other browsers have offered this function in one way or another (separate search bars, toolbars, plug-ins, etc.) but never has the workflow been this natural and easy (from later tests I found that I didn’t even have to hit the tab). That’s just one of many features they’ve included in their browser (the Omnibox).

They also snatched up the fastest JavaScript engine on the market (up to ten times than the system Firefox is running, and WAY faster than the IE JavaScript), and they set up their infrastructure to prevent many of the problems that older browsers are facing today with common viruses, bugs and page crashes that can disable the browser or even the whole computer.  
For more details on the technical aspects of this new browser, check out some of these articles:

  • Wired Magazine – the one I read that got me interested – the history, reasons behind it and some of the new technology in a well-written, easy-to-read, fun presentation
  • Blogoscoped – very good basic rundown of the features
  • Washington Post – good review of some of the features
  • PC World – good article, seven reasons for it and against it
  • USA Today – a nice, brief review

In the end, Chrome has many awesome, powerful features that make it very attractive to me. I may end up switching when they make those last couple of changes to make it just a little more attractive to this (still) loyal Firefox user.

No matter what happens, though, I’m keeping my Firefox t-shirt.

WordPress Google Docs

I love that WordPress shows search terms that are pulling your stuff up on the Internet. In fact, I love a lot of things about WordPress. I am also a big fan of Google Docs, and when I first began using this “blog” thing, I wanted to use Google Docs to post my entries.

Unfortunately, as my first post indicates, I had troubles getting it set up. I got the following message: Error decoding XML-RPC response.

Now, I’m not technical genius, and I can only vaguely describe what that error message means, but I played around a bit and got things working.

I started posting all sorts of cool stories, technical ideas, and anything else I felt like sharing. Unfortunately, nobody was interested.

At least eight people have searched for a solution to this problem and were sent to my blog and the number one search term that pulls me up online is “error decoding xml-rpc responce” from Google Docs in one way or another. I guess not too many people actually have problems with this message, but those who do have no idea where to find help for it. I may be wrong, but I also want to help out where I can. So, here’s how I solved the problem. It may not be the best way, but it has worked for me.

I’ll provide a screenshot, but essentially I didn’t use the preset settings for WordPress found in the Google Docs options for posting to a blog. At the top of the “Blog Site Settings” window I clicked on the “My own server / custom” radio button. Here are the rest of the settings I used:

(RED text means you should insert your personal information. Black means yours should be the same.)

(Click the image to view it full size.)

API:

“MetaWeblog API”

URL:

“http://mereman.wordpress.com/xmlrpc.php”

-(If you really do host your blog at a different URL, the wordpress.com part my be different too. The part before the “/xmlrpc.php” is the address you give to people so they can visit your blog.)

User Name:

mediocrerenaissanceman

-(This is the whole user name you log into the site with.)

Password:

wouldn’t you like to know?

Blog ID/Title:

The Mediocre Renaissance Man

-(This is the title displayed at the head of your pages and at the top of the WordPress site while you are at your dashboard.)

Last of all I have the box checked that says: “Include the document title when posting (if supported)” and I think you should too if you want to use the document title as your posting title.

The only warning I should mention is that when I use Google Docs to post it doesn’t go immediate. When I go to WordPress afterward it says the post is scheduled for seven hours later. If I want to post immediately I then go in and edit the post at the WordPress site, changing the settings to “Published” and the time to five minutes earlier. This works, but if anyone knows of a better way to get Google Docs to do it immediately, I could use the help.

I hope this helps, and if you have any more questions or ideas, please leave a comment.

Getting Up

I know they say it’s better for the body to get up at the same time very morning and go the sleep at the same time every night, but my body is not yet thanking me for getting up consistently at five forty-five every morning. Perhaps this is because we have a three-month-old daughter who prevents us from getting to sleep at the same time every night and who prevents us from getting very good sleep at night.

In the end, today is Saturday and I am up but my body has not decided that this is acceptable. In fact, my customized iGoogle homepage has a dynamic header consisting of a cityscape scene which is home to a monster who does various activities throughout the day and night. I log in at midday and he’s sweeping the city, I log in in the morning and he is taking a bath in the bay (I think the city is San Fransisco, but there is no Golden Gate bridge), late at night he battles a robot monster that looks like him. My point being that I just pulled it up to get to Google Docs and he was still fast asleep. Oh, how I envy him.

I may envy the little red monster, but I’m not really complaining – I’ve actually really enjoyed and benefited a lot from getting up and writing every morning. I’m currently contemplating slowly getting up even earlier to add another hour or half an hour to my morning writing time.

Just so you all know, I write and post short stories up here to get feedback and comments. If you happen to take the time to read one of my stories, I would be grateful to have even a brief bit of feedback from you in the form of a comment (most appropriately commented on the actual story, not on this post, for example).

I don’t think that’s too much to ask. Anyone who undertakes any creative effort wants to know what other people think of their work. Even if the creative endeavor is something domestic like parenting or cooking, it feels good to know that someone else things you did a good job and it can be helpful if someone shares some constructive criticism to help you do better next time. The idea is not to learn and bow to the popular ideas, but to look for good advice and tips then decide which ones you’ll follow.

Of course, even if everyone reading my stuff is a deadbeat, at least I’m getting writing practice in. I think want I need is a dedicated writing partner, or at least one or two good friends who consistently read my work and provide feedback. I should place a wanted ad. Here’s how it could read:


WANTED: Writer seeking Reader

I am an aspiring writer seeking an avid reader to consistently and tirelessly read my ramblings and provide constructive criticism and feedback.

The applicant must be interested in a wide variety of subjects and be willing to tell the truth nicely. Even when the reading material is uninteresting, skimming will not be appreciated or helpful, and an objective view must be taken remembering that if the writer is interested there must be a reader somewhere who is interested too.

Any interested in the job must be willing to work for free and commit to a longterm relationship that is only as deep as the words on the page. Of course, if the applicant already enjoys another relationship with the writer this job would only add another dimension to our interactions.

If you are interested respond via any means possible to discuss the terms of your surrender, er, um, terms of your voluntary service.

Of course, even personals need to be shorter than that, I think. If I were to really post such an ad, I can think of at least three or four really great friends of mine who I would hope to have respond and commit.

While I suppose the above ad is hypothetical and, to a certain extent, in jest, it would be nice to know that someone is always going to provide me with thoughtful responses to my ideas. I usually feel like I’m in the dark about what people think of me as a person, at the very least I would like to know what they think of my writing.

Wow, last of all, I’d just like to add that I’m not as desperate, depressed or negative as it may seem. I’m going through a transitional stage right now where my body is mad and grumpy about getting up in the morning and my heart is asking if it’s even worth it to write. Deep down, I know I have to write. When I’m not writing enough, it shows in my daily life. So regardless of what you or anyone else thinks, I’m going to write. It’s not about getting feedback or being happy about waking up early, it’s about fulfilling my need to express myself and get words together to tell stories and share ideas.

Right. Now I’m going to work on some fiction or something.

Odds of Death

I don’t have enough time to go through Digg all of the time, but every once and a while I check to see what’s going on. I loved this:

Click Me!

Found here:
http://pixdaus.com/single.php?id=37189&frm=krsn

Why do I love it? Because of its beautiful reminder that no matter how we go, we’re all guaranteed to die someday, somehow. We all have a 1:1 chance of dying. How do you like that!?!

Oh, a little update. In my first blog posting here I complained of technical problems with submitting posts from Google Docs. I have since resolved all such issues and the last two posts have been via Google Docs. Yeah for me! If you experience a similar problem, it’s not that difficult to fix, just let me know and I’ll hook you up.

I found a few other things on digg not too long ago, but they’re tough to find a second time (should have marked them somehow). Anyhow, watch for more postings of my meaningless ramblings in the near future.

Welcome Me

I always told myself I would stay away from “popular” stuff, mainstream trends and Internet terms like “blog.”  Blog just sounds dumb, the spell checker doesn’t like it, and when I think about “blogging” nothing interesting comes to mind.  However, here I am, writing my first post to a dedicated “blogging” site.  I chose WordPress.com because of its professional look and mature name.  We’ll see how I like it here.

Since I have NO idea how many people will spot me as a new user, find me out of the blue, etc., I’m going to do a test.  I have a question, so anyone out there that happens to read this and might have an answer, please let me know.  I am an avid fan/user of Google Docs, and I’ve run into a little hiccup with their posting to blog service.  I’ve entered all of my information (username, password, etc.) and it appears to be correct, but it comes back with an error: Error decoding XML-RPC response.  What the heck does that mean and how do I fix it?  Thanks.

Well, I suppose that’s all from me for now.  My primary purpose in starting this “thing” (I’m going to avoid using that strange Internet jargon term) is to improve my writing by practicing.  I’ll rant about stuff, I’ll post short stories, I’ll share ideas.  I’m also going to assume NOBODY is reading, so I’ll get really excited if people actually comment and respond to stuff.  If I get nothing, that’s what I expect out of nobody!

Watch for something exciting soon.

*****UPDATE*****

I have a new post that explains how I solved the “Error decoding XML-RPC response” problem with Google Docs and WordPress.


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